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Numeracy

As with literacy the different areas of numeracy are covered through a spiral curriculum.  Topics are repeatedly revisited, consolidating and building on the learning that has gone before.  The focus is on the practical application of mathematical skills to real life with the aim of ensuring pupils go on to be as independent as possible in their adult lives, as well as preparing them for the accreditations they will take in Upper School. 

Practical activities linked to pupils interests are key in ensuring engagement and motivation, which leads to progression.  Life skills such as cooking, shopping, budgeting and using public transport all rely heavily on numeracy skills.  As such numeracy lessons are often combined with other aspects of the curriculum to show pupils where the skills learned in school directly impact them. 

Systematic thinking and problem solving are also a key focus, particularly in the context of the worded problems children are likely to encounter during their accreditations.

At the Collett we place a strong focus on supporting pupils to use and apply their numeracy skills as an important and functional part of their daily routines, for example during shopping trips or when following a recipe whilst cooking. Functional Numeracy is applied across the curriculum in order to ensure pupils can make connections between areas of study and, within our community as relevant and helpful knowledge/skill sets.

Our intent is that each student develops the mathematical skills that enable them to live as independently as possible.

Numeracy Topics:

  • Money
  • Time
  • Measure
  • Calculation
  • Functional Fractions
  • Direction
  • Shape
  • Data
  • Problem solving

We teach mathematics daily and apply maths across other areas of the curriculum, such as cookery, horticulture, animal care and topic.  Pupils use everyday technology to support them in independently applying their knowledge and understanding to real-life situations.

 

Entry Level Functional Numeracy Accreditations

We follow the Pearsons Entry Level Maths Specification

Entry Level One: Functional Numeracy

Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Entry Level 1

Learners at Entry Level 1 are expected to become confident in their use of fundamental mathematical knowledge and skills, as described through the following content areas, and demonstrate their understanding by applying their knowledge and skills to solve simple mathematical problems or carry out simple tasks.

Entry Level 1: Using numbers and the number system – whole numbers

  • E1.1 Read, write, order and compare numbers up to 20
  • E1.2 Use whole numbers to count up to 20 items, including zero
  • E1.3 Add numbers which total up to 20, and subtract numbers from numbers up to 20
  • E1.4 Recognise and interpret the symbols +, – and = appropriately 2. Content area: Using common measures, shape and space Content
  • E1.5 Recognise coins and notes and write them in numbers with the correct symbols (£ & p), where these involve numbers up to 20
  • E1.6 Read 12-hour digital and analogue clocks in hours
  • E1.7 Know the number of days in a week, months and seasons in a year; be able to name and sequence
  • E1.8 Describe and make comparisons in words between measures of items including size, length, width, height, weight and capacity
  • E1.9 Identify and recognise common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including circle, cube, rectangle (including square) and triangle
  • E1.10 Use everyday positional vocabulary to describe position and direction, including left, right, in front, behind, under and above

Entry Level 1: Handing information and data

  • E1.11 Read numerical information from lists
  • E1.12 Sort and classify objects using a single criterion
  • E1.13 Read and draw simple charts and diagrams, including a tally chart, block diagram/graph

Entry level 1: Solving mathematical problems and decision-making

Entry Level 1 learners are expected to be able to use the knowledge and skills listed above to recognise a simple mathematical problem and obtain a solution. A simple mathematical problem is one which requires working through one step or process. At Entry Level 1, it is expected that learners will be able to address individual problems, each of which draws on knowledge and/or skills from one mathematical content area (i.e. number and the number system; common measures, shape and space; information and data).

 

Entry Level Two: Functional Numeracy

Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Entry Level 2

Learners at Entry Level 2 are expected to become confident in their use of fundamental mathematical knowledge and skills, as described through the following content areas, and demonstrate their understanding by applying their knowledge and skills to solve simple mathematical problems or carry out simple tasks.

Entry Level 2: Using numbers and the number system – whole numbers, fractions and decimals

  • E2.1 Count reliably up to 100 items
  • E2.2 Read, write, order and compare numbers up to 200
  • E2.3 Recognise and sequence odd and even numbers up to 100
  • E2.4 Recognise and interpret the symbols +, –, ×, ÷ and = appropriately
  • E2.5 Add and subtract two-digit numbers
  • E2.6 Multiply whole numbers in the range 0 × 0 to 12 × 12 (times tables)
  • E2.7 Know the number of hours in a day and weeks in a year; be able to name and sequence
  • E2.8 Divide two-digit whole numbers by single-digit whole numbers and express remainders
  • E2.9 Approximate by rounding to the nearest 10, and use this rounded answer to check results
  • E2.10 Recognise simple fractions (halves, quarters and tenths) of whole numbers and shapes
  • E2.11 Read, write and use decimals to one decimal place

 

Entry Level 2: Using common measures, shape and space

  • E2.12 Calculate money with pence up to one pound and in whole pounds of multiple items and write with the correct symbols (£ or p)
  • E2.13 Read and record time in common date formats and read time displayed on analogue clocks in hours, half hours and quarter hours, and understand hours from a 24-hour digital clock
  • E2.14 Use metric measures of length, including millimetres, centimetres, metres and kilometres
  • E2.15 Use measures of weight, including grams and kilograms
  • E2.16 Use measures of capacity, including millilitres and litres
  • E2.17 Read and compare positive temperatures
  • E2.18 Read and use simple scales to the nearest labelled division
  • E2.19 Recognise and name 2-D and 3-D shapes, including pentagons, hexagons, cylinders, cuboids, pyramids and spheres
  • E2.20 Describe the properties of common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including numbers of sides, corners, edges, faces, angles and base
  • E2.21 Use appropriate positional vocabulary to describe position and direction, including between, inside, outside, middle, below, on top, forwards and backwards

 

Entry Level 2: Handing information and data

  • E2.22 Extract information from lists, tables, diagrams and bar charts
  • E2.23 Make numerical comparisons from bar charts
  • E2.24 Sort and classify objects using two criteria
  • E2.25 Take information from one format and represent the information in another format, including use of bar charts

Entry Level 2 Solving mathematical problems and decision-making

Entry Level 2 learners are expected to be able to use the knowledge and skills listed above to recognise a simple problem and obtain a solution. A simple problem is one which requires working through one step or process. At Entry Level 2, it is expected that learners will be able to address individual problems, each of which draws on knowledge and/or skills from one mathematical content area (i.e. number and the number system; common measures, shape and space; information and data).

 

Entry Level Three: Functional Numeracy

Learners at Entry Level 3 are expected to become confident in their use of fundamental mathematical knowledge and skills, as described through the following content areas, and demonstrate their understanding by applying their knowledge and skills to solve simple mathematical problems or carry out simple tasks.

Entry Level 3: Using numbers and the number system – whole numbers, fractions and decimals

  • E3.1 Count, read, write, order and compare numbers up to 1000
  • E3.2 Add and subtract using three-digit whole numbers
  • E3.3 Divide three-digit whole numbers by single- and double-digit whole numbers and express remainders
  • E3.4 Multiply two-digit whole numbers by single- and double-digit whole numbers
  • E3.5 Approximate by rounding numbers less than 1000 to the nearest 10 or 100 and use this rounded answer to check results
  • E3.6 Recognise and continue linear sequences of numbers up to 100
  • E3.7 Read, write and understand thirds, quarters, fifths and tenths, including equivalent forms
  • E3.8 Read, write and use decimals up to two decimal places
  • E3.9 Recognise and continue sequences that involve decimals

 

Entry Level 3:  Using common measures, shape and space

  • E3.10 Calculate with money using decimal notation and express money correctly in writing in pounds and pence
  • E3.11 Round amounts of money to the nearest £1 or 10p
  • E3.12 Read, measure and record time using am and pm
  • E3.13 Read time from analogue and 24-hour digital clocks in hours and minutes
  • E3.14 Use and compare measures of length, capacity, weight and temperature using metric or imperial units to the nearest labelled or unlabelled division
  • E3.15 Compare metric measures of length, including millimetres, centimetres, metres and kilometres E3.16 Compare measures of weight, including grams and kilograms
  • E3.17 Compare measures of capacity, including millilitres and litres
  • E3.18 Use a suitable instrument to measure mass and length
  • E3.19 Sort 2-D and 3-D shapes using properties, including lines of symmetry, length, right angles, angles, including in rectangles and triangles
  • E3.20 Use appropriate positional vocabulary to describe position and direction, including eight compass points and full/half/quarter turns

 

Entry Level 3: Handing information and data

  • E3.21 Extract information from lists, tables, diagrams and charts and create frequency tables
  • E3.22 Interpret information, to make comparisons and record changes, from different formats, including bar charts and simple line graphs
  • E3.23 Organise and represent information in appropriate ways, including tables, diagrams, simple line graphs and bar charts

 

Entry Level 3: Solving mathematical problems and decision-making

Entry Level 3 learners are expected to be able to use the knowledge and skills listed above to recognise a simple problem and obtain a solution. A simple problem is one which requires working through one step or process. At Entry Level 3, it is expected that learners will be able to address individual problems, each of which draws on knowledge and/or skills from one mathematical content area (i.e. number and the number system; common measures, shape and space; information and data).

Functional Numeracy Level 1

Edexcel's specifications for Functional Numeracy Level One